Table of Contents


elective sectioning - tells you where you are going and when

Elective #1

Wednesday July 29 – 10:00 am - 11:45 am

Avidan -- How to Find and Write New Affs

Yasser Arafat would have been good 2A. He knew never to spend two nights in the same place. But how exactly does one discover and construct new affs? When is it advisable or inadvisable to “break” one? What other points of strategy and etiquette are important? Take this elective, or the Mossad will find you and give you AIDS.

Berthiaume – Basic Flowing

You'll learn strategies for ensuring that you write down and can read everything you need to write down. You'll also learn strategies for dealing with missing args on your flow and tips for flowing on the computer. Please bring your usual flowing materials to class - either paper/pens or your laptop.

Harkins -- Negative Strategery

Or how to make being affirmative even harder. This elective will discuss skills, pre-round preparation and in-round techniques that can help you move your negative strategery to devastating strategy. In addition to generic discussion of negative argumentation, we will discuss topic-specific arguments and strategies to deploy next year.

Lee -- Everyone Links to Politics!

-Debating the Politics DA
-How to Cut a Politics DA
-Tips and Tricks

Olsen -- Debating for a Small School

Debating at a school with fewer resources and fewer debaters often requires a different approach to debate. This group will talk about both how to deal with logistics (housing, funding, finding a sponsor, etc.), debate questions about picking argument types and how to approach research.

Quinn -- Answering the K, with Capitalism as the example

The key to winning on the Aff against the K is to, as the Zen saying goes, “ride your horse along the edge of the sword and hide in the middle of the flames.” Most 2AC’s against the K use a fly-swatter when chopsticks will do. You’ll learn how to shape and rephrase your answers to make them more responsive and offensive against any kritik, with Capitalism as the model.

Serrano -- 2A: back to basics

If you're scared you're making fundamental mistakes in the 2ac, this elective is for you. We'll cover a 2ac checklist and talk about how to make and organize modular locks, how to allocate your time, how to help the 1ar effectively, and how to put the most pressure on the negative block.

Strange -- A Theory and Strategy of Topicality

We'll talk about a theory of T standards and discuss how that view of topicality can be used to argue T on the negative more effectively.

Elective #2

Thursday July 30 – 10:00 am - 10:50 am

Avidan -- New 1AR Arguments

Saving your best arguments for the 1AR will cause the negative to extend unwinnable positions in the block and put serious time pressure on the 2NR. Also, sometimes the 2AC drops things. Learn how to frame new 1AR arguments as “extensions” of 2AC arguments or “responses” to block arguments with even the strictest of judges.

Berthiaume -- T Subsets

There are tons of social services. There are tons of groups to which they can be given. Come to this elective to find how to substantially narrow the topic. We will discuss both making and answering this topicality argument.

Clark -- Debating the Case (Aff and Neg)

Even highly skilled debaters often have trouble answering and extending case arguments. We’ll talk about how to debate the case without destroying the line-by-line structure or getting bogged down and wasting your time. We’ll practice these skills using case-debating drills.

Culpepper – The Art of Intimidation

90 percent of everything in life is about confidence. We are not sure what the other 10 percent is, but we do know that it doesn’t matter when you act like you think you know what you are doing, even when you have no clue. Come and learn how to mind*k your opponents into making mistakes and trick judges to vote for you even when you know you’ve lost a debate.

Harkins -- Making Google Work for You

The Internets will do a lot for you these days. We will go over how to take advantage of it. In addition to Google, we’ll go over other electronic research tools and advanced research techniques.

Jennings -- Defending the Disad

Given the lack of big impacts with the poverty topic it’ll be important to defend that a nuclear war does in fact outweigh poverty concerns. Learn how to prove that great power wars could still happen, that predictions are accurate, and other general defenses of the disad against K affs.

Lambelle -- Beating the States CP on Theory

The states counterplan will consistently pose problems for the affirmative this year. Unless, of course, the affirmative can make the counterplan disappear…

Olney -- How to be a top speaker


Some people win speaker awards because they’re funny or have tons of talent. The rest of us don’t have it so easy. Come here to join the revolution and find out how those of us who have no personality and just like to cut cards can start raking in the speaker awards.

Russell -- The Critique of Law

The class will provide an overview of some of the more common law critiques, including CLS, CRT, the Feminist critique of law, and Critical Latino/a studies as well as emerging "outsider" theory, as well as providing some ideas for debating the arguments of the aff and neg, emphasizing some of the permutations implicit in the critiques themselves.

Serrano -- Advanced Impact Analysis

Advanced discussion of impact analysis which will include specific evidence and real practice of comparing impacts.

Turner -- Philosophy of Theory

Many critical approaches to debate raise philosophical questions about the meaning, desirability, and possibility of some of debate's most treasured theoretical concepts-fairness, limits, and equity to name a few. Kritiks of T and theory require a substantive debate about the theory of theory. This elective will discuss various criticisms and philosophical defenses of procedural impacts.


Elective #3

Thursday July 30 – 11:00 am - 11:50 am

Avidan -- Search Smarter, Not Harder

If your searches don't include long strings of text in quotations, you are wasting your time. Searching effectively is the closest you can come to writing your own cards. I'll discuss my theory of “how good cards get written” and how to apply that to Google searching. I'll also share some search terms that tend to find good cards on any topic.

Culpepper – How to be Neg on the Aff

This elective is not for the weak at heart nor the hippie activist. If you have a fetish for nuclear war or anything that terminates in extinction, then I encourage you to come as we will emphasize that fetish. This elective is for those who want to learn the tricks and skills needed to debate the largest big stick policy affirmatives on the topic.

Greenstein -- Batman and Not Quite Robin: How to Win with a Partner that is not up to Par.

We never like to admit it, but sometimes we are better than our partners. Learn how to be successful debating with someone who is not as good as you while still maintaining their friendship.

Harkins -- Debating from Home: You’ve Won or Lost Before You’ve Left for the Tournament

One of the most overlooked debate “skills” is organization. Your in-round success is directly correlated with how much thought you’ve put into an argument before you’ve used it, and how usable that argument is in a file. We will go over file organization and time management strategies. I promise it is not nearly as boring as it sounds.

Kaczmarek – Dr. Seuss for Fun and Profit

Dr. Seuss “was a member of the Dartmouth Class of 1925” so what better place is there to explore my favorite Dr. Seuss book Fox in Socks. There are several fine passages in this book to train the eyes and the tongues of debaters who aspire to be both quick and clear, and perhaps even animated. Join me for some tongue-tangling practice.

Lambelle -- Beating the States CP on Theory

The states counterplan will consistently pose problems for the affirmative this year. Unless, of course, the affirmative can make the counterplan disappear…

Quinn -- Tub-thumping 2AR’s

The last speech in the debate isn’t supposed to be delivered through your nose or hiding behind your laptop. Even Roger Solt once said, “If the 2AR was a weapon, it would be a sledgehammer…with bombs taped to it.” Come learn how to make judges stop flowing and just listen to the power of your delivery. We’ll practice some techniques, so bring comfortable shoes and protective eyewear.

Russell -- Making arguments without cards

Sometimes the most important arguments in a debate can be made without reading any evidence. In addition, many of the most important arguments are made based on the other teams evidence. This class will offer some suggestions for generating arguments from cross ex and making arguments without evidence.

Serrano -- Advanced Impact Analysis

Advanced discussion of impact analysis which will include specific evidence and real practice of comparing impacts.

Turner -- Affirmative Inclusive Kritiks and other kritik heresies

A long long time ago in a galaxy far far away we used to not feel afraid about making kritiks aff inclusive or reading alternatives with no text [gasp!]. We can live in that world again-join the rebellion against the darkside of the anti-K empire.


Elective #4

Saturday August 1 – 10:00 am - 10:50 am

Avidan -- The Amendment CP

The word on the street is that some people are thinking about fiating the Courts this year. Let me tell you all about the reason why the Aff did not win many debates on the college “Overrule” topic a few years ago. We'll talk about how to run this CP effectively, and also how to (try to) beat it.

Greenstein -- The Magic of Intrinsicness

How to eliminate all of your opponent's off-case arguments with the wave of your hand, a coke, and a smile.

Harkins -- Something funny happened on the way to the 2NR

It was the 1AR. In many high school rounds, debates are won or lost in the 1AR. This lecture will go over 1AR techniques and tricks to make the 2NR’s life hell.

Jennings – Politics

Politics is the go-to generic on small domestic topics and will be prevalent throughout the year. Learn how to successfully master this generic yet effective negative argument.

Kaczmarek – Confessions of a Former T Hack

It wasn’t that many years ago that debaters knew a well-written, well-argued topicality violation would guarantee my ballot, but somewhere along the line the topicality train has run off the tracks. I’d like to help you bring back topicality as more than just the time suck it mostly is today.

Lambelle -- The Art of Cross Examination

Cross – X is the most underutilized 12 minutes of speech time in almost every debate. This elective will focus on strategies to uses cross examination most effectively to win debates and increase speaker points.

Olney -- Impact comparisons

It seems so simple. But debates are won and lost at the margins and impact comparisons are one of the least effectively utilized ways of tipping the scales. Rather than sticking to the rote, unthinking application of probability, magnitude, timeframe, and ‘turns the case’ we will delve into the seldom-seen world of well constructed impact evaluation.

Russell – Normativity

Schlag's critique of contemporary legal thought provides an interesting argument for debate, because much of the criticism he levels at the legal academy (borrowing heavily from Foucault) applies so easily to debate, and its conception of fiat. The class will provide an overview of Schlag's critique and some ideas for answering it.

Serrano -- How to be Top Speaker

So you think you have done your speaking drills? Learn the next step beyond just talking pretty in this 1 hour elective that covers how to make sure you sound as good as possible and how to make the arguments that will get you good points.

Turner -- Negative Strategy against Non-Traditional Affirmatives

Framework just doesn't cut it so what do you do? This elective will discuss research strategies for dealing with nontraditional affs.

Elective #5

Saturday August 1 – 11:00 am - 11:50 am

Berthiaume -- Camp to Greenhill - Preparation and Debating New Affirmatives

This class will teach you how to prepare for debates and what you need to do between the day you go home and the first debate of the year. The first part will discuss at-home preparation, the second will discuss debating new affirmatives.

Culpepper – Theory

Understanding the underpinnings of all theory arguments, and creating a way to approach them in a debate.

Greenstein -- The Magic of Intrinsicness

How to eliminate all of your opponent's off-case arguments with the wave of your hand, a coke, and a smile.

Jennings -- Impact Turning

Poverty good, deforestation good, economic growth bad, nuclear war good. Learn the ins and outs of making the aff or neg defend their impacts by turning their arguments.

Lee -- How to Win as a Team

-The Importance of Team Work
-Scouting/How to Scout
-Morals (Respect)
-Division of Labor
-Debate and Networks

Olney -- Rethinking Foucault

Foucault is the most commonly deployed critique author, but is often misunderstood. This elective will offer some background on his thinking and use that as a springboard for discussing how to more effectively use Foucault to construct your Ks, as well as how affirmatives can exploit the contradictions created by the traditional interpretation.

Olsen -- The 2NR

The Elective will cover giving the Hardest speech in debate. We will go over important core concepts such as combining efficiency with persuasion, picking the right arguments to go for, using prep time effectively, and pre-empting the 2AR.

Quinn -- How to Write a Case Neg to Win the Case Debate

Most Case Negatives have a few T cards, some Politics links, unorganized case arguments and some bad CP’s without clear net benefits. This elective will focus on how to start researching an affirmative in order to leverage more strategic offense and defense on the case. Never thought you could run 8 minutes of case in the 1NC? We’ll work on how to expand your negative perspective to creatively exploit the 1AC.

Russell -- Weighing poverty

Many of the impacts on this topic do not, at first glance, compare in "magnitude" to some of the more common debate impacts: depression, nuclear war, pandemics, climate change, etc. In fact, the impacts of poverty are often invisible to us, even in our own communities. This class will look at ways to understand and "weigh" the poverty impacts and win debates.

Serrano -- How to be Top Speaker

So you think you have done your speaking drills? Learn the next step beyond just talking pretty in this 1 hour elective that covers how to make sure you sound as good as possible and how to make the arguments that will get you good points.

Strange -- PICs 'R Good

We'll go over answers to the typical affirmative whines about plan inclusive counterplans.

Elective #6

Monday August 3 – 10:00 am - 10:50 am

Avidan -- How to Debate Without Flowing

Debate isn't always about writing things down. I have a few suggestions that will free up your in-round time for reading the other team's evidence, picking up on non-verbals, searching through poorly organized backfiles, and cutting new cards on the internet. Aspiring stenographers need not apply.

Berthiaume – The States CP/50 State Fiat

This class will teach you how to make and answer theoretical and substantive arguments about the states counterplan.

Clark -- Transitioning from Poverty to Energy

Debating the poverty topic will be very different from debating the energy topic. This topic lecture will explain how the new topic will affect your debates. You will learn how you should debate differently and how you can take advantage of the new topic.

Culpepper/Greenstein -- Hero or Villain? The Key to a Successful Debate Career

Come to this only if you are serious about life

Harkins -- The Not-So-Great Debater

Many of us were not born talented debaters. This elective is geared toward those of you who enjoy debate but aren’t necessarily the Debater of the Year. It isn’t easy, but there are ways to beat even the best debaters if you’re willing to put in the time. Learn how to capitalize on the strengths of your opponents.

Jennings -- Answering the K

Nothing’s more frustrating than losing to the stupid suffering good K for the 18th time. Learn the five most commonly dropped arguments that keep costing affirmative wins.

Olney -- Reading an aff with a “small” impact

Many of the good affs this year don’t offer a lot in the way of body counts. This group will discuss how to convince your judges that things like denial of health care, gender discrimination, and racial injustice are more important than yet another fanciful chain of internal links to nuclear war. The goal here is to shatter the myth that you have to read a “K aff” or talk about deontology if you have anything other than extinction impacts.


Olsen -- The 1AR

The elective will go over How to do the two most important things in this speech: Allowing the 2AR to Win and Screwing with the 2NR. A LOT of this speech can be improved with technique.

Russell -- Impact Assessment

This will be a "practice class" involving clash drills debating some of the most common impact cards, in which debaters will compare an impact they have been assigned to defend against an opponent with a different impact. The class will include some of the "classic" new and old debate impact cards and include tips for weighing and assessing those impacts against other common impacts.

Turner -- Kritiking Disads/Defending Disads

We'll talk through setting up aff strategies that focus on criticizing disads as well as choosing negative disad/cp strategies that anticipate this increasingly frequent aff strategy.

Elective #7

Monday August 3 – 11:00 am - 11:50 am

Avidan -- Try or Die

Tired of losing to alternative causalities and/or cutting solvency cards? Come and learn why “inevitable” is not a synonym for “irrelevant”. You'll also learn how to identify members of the “try-or-die community” in the judging pool, and how to respond effectively on the negative.

Clark -- Transitioning from Poverty to Energy

Debating the poverty topic will be very different from debating the energy topic. This topic lecture will explain how the new topic will affect your debates. You will learn how you should debate differently and how you can take advantage of the new topic.

Culpepper -- You want to debate in the Elims?

Well it’s different than the prelims because there are panels. This elective will explore the ways you should treat debating in front of a panel differently than in front of a single judge. You think it's boring then you'll likely lose in the doubles.

Jennings -- The 2AC

The 2ac allows the aff to shift the debate back to their ground and is vitally important for setting up winning rebuttals. Learn how to prepare and effectively execute sound 2ACs.

Lee – Hegemony

-Strategy as an Advantage
-Answering Impact Turns
-Tips and Tricks

Olney -- Nietzsche and his heirs

We’ll talk about what Nietzsche really says, why the debate argument is so difficult to answer, and how it lays the groundwork for a whole variety of 20th century critical theory.

Olsen -- Debate for the Socially Inept and/or Anti-Social

I'm not going to lie, I have the social skills of a 2nd grade caveman and I have to think really hard before I speak. Nonetheless, I still debated and I have some thoughts on how to deal with this. This could be the most awkward elective in the history of the DDI.

Russell -- Debating the Courts

The last couple topics have not included much debate regarding the court system. This class will provide a very brief introduction on the working of the court system. The class will then give an overview of debating the courts by looking at past topics, and giving tips about debating theory on courts counterplans, and debating common disads on the courts.

Serrano -- Advanced Counterplan Text Writing

If the negs have fiat, why not use all of it? We'll talk about how to counterplanning out of EVERYTHING you know they might say and can anticipate they might say. You'll never lose a solvency deficit after this elective.

Turner -- Poverty, K Affs, and Risk Assessment

We'll focus on the aff side of reading a critical aff with a plan with non-utilitarian impact calculus--how to make this persuasive for a wider variety of judges, how to find evidence that makes these arguments, and other related topics.
Example Evidence

Elective #8

Tuesday August 4 – 10:00 am – 11:50 am

Clark -- The 2AC: For Good or For Awesome?

A good 2AC makes smart arguments on all of the flows. An awesome 2AC makes the block virtually impossible and makes the 1AR significantly more effective. I will talk for an hour about giving the 2AC and then we will work on examples. Bring 2AC blocks that we can edit as a group.

Culpepper/Rein – Drawing a line in the Sand

This theory session will explore the lost art of beating those radical crazy K teams that will defend nothing, well certainly nothing you are prepared to debate. It’s not just old school fairness but a new way of conceptualizing a vision of debate that requires the affirmative to answer the question posed by the resolution without defending hard set rules.

Greenstein -- How to win with nothing

"5 Stars" says Ebert and Roeper, New York Times declares this lecture "A must see!", "No one should attend camp without seeing this!" heralds random farmer.

Jennings – Nonverbal Debating

How rounds are executed outside of the debate round plays a huge role in the outcome of debates. Everything from the fonts on your cards to your in-round interactions with the judge can ultimately determine whether you win or lose. Attend this lecture to avoid common mishaps that can tank your ability to win.

Lambelle -- Death to Politics

Learn how to beat the politics DA using theory arguments that never have to be updated. The discussion will focus on intrinsiness and other politics theory arguments like fiat solves the link, vote no, etc.

Olney/Turner -- The Other F-Word-Framework

One of us loves to hate it, the other hates to love it. Two hours answering the eternal question-who is winning John or Charles?

Quinn -- Migraine-inducing 1NR’s

With the extra prep time, 1NR’s are held to higher standards. Learn how to exceed even those expectations and enjoy the best speech in debate. No 1AR will consider standing-up ever again, not even if they’re Chuck Norris. Apologies to the National Migraine Association.

Strange -- Disad Strategy

We'll discuss strategies for winning DAs and apply those strategies to DAs chosen by the class.

Elective #9

Thursday August 6 – 9:00 am – 9:50 am

Berthiaume – Introduction to Paperless Debate

This elective will discuss some of the issues around paperless debate, including: mechanics, tech requirements, and in-round implementation. Please bring a laptop (see me if you don't have one) with a copy of the DDI template loaded on it.

Clark -- Debating Topicality on the Aff

Tired of losing on T-Substantial is without material qualifications? This elective will cover debating topicality in the 2AC, 1AR, and 2AR. In particular, I will focus on constructing and defending counter-interpretations. I will also specifically address the main T issue for next year, “persons living in poverty.”

Harkins -- Something funny happened on the way to the 2NR

It was the 1AR. In many high school rounds, debates are won or lost in the 1AR. This lecture will go over 1AR techniques and tricks to make the 2NR’s life hell.

Kaczmarek – Nuclear War…Again…Are You Serious?

I remember the China topic and the Russia topic, and with those topics the constant threat of nuclear war actually made some sense, but when the topic asks us to provide social services to persons living in poverty, why exactly are we pulling out our nuclear umbrellas? This class is designed to explore some of debate’s favorite nuclear wars and to devise a new argumentative approach to a now years old problem (Mead ’92, Kahlilzad ’95, Bearden 2K, etc.).

Lambelle -- Debating New Affirmatives

What to do both before and during debate tournaments to deal with new affirmatives or obscure arguments that you may not have a great deal of evidence to answer.

Olsen -- Abusing the Affirmative

I realized most of the Lab Leaders at the Camp were 2A's. It is important to know that 2A's are all liars. In order to compensate for their lying, we will discuss some "theoretically questionable" strategies for this topic (think fun abuse not veto-cheto etc.).

Russell -- The Cap K on a poverty topic

Is the provision of social services to those living in poverty an implicit critique of capitalism, illustrating the failures of capitalism to provide for the basic needs of its citizens, or are social services "masking", or do they help capitalism avert a crisis by providing benefits to those who might otherwise challenge the system? This class will provide tips for framings links and affirmative answers to the capitalism K, along with ideas for debating permutations and transition arguments.

Serrano -- Advanced Counterplan Text Writing

If the negs have fiat, why not use all of it? We'll talk about how to counterplanning out of EVERYTHING you know they might say and can anticipate they might say. You'll never lose a solvency deficit after this elective.

Strange -- Strategic CX

Used effectively, cross examination can help you win debates. We'll talk about the type of questions to ask and how to ask them, and we'll practice those techniques.

Turner -- Golden Oldies

We'll talk through some classic K arguments that just keep winning debates even though they shouldn't. Chart-toppers include No Value to Life, FIAT Illusory, Don't trust any affirmative authors, and others.


Elective #10

Friday August 7 – 9:00 am – 9:50 am

Berthiaume -- Impact Analysis - Beyond "Magnitude, Probability, Time Frame"

Good impact analysis wins debates! But let's face facts, most impact analysis is boring enough to make judges fall asleep. This elective will discuss how to weigh impacts while moving beyond the "MPT checklist."

Clark -- Flowing

Debaters who are skilled at flowing win more debates because they are better at clash and line-by-line, they don’t drop arguments, and they prep more efficiently. I’ll discuss tips for both paper and computer flowing and then we’ll practice.

Culpepper – Forcing the K to Answer the Aff

No Framework, Just logical consistent arguments about how to deploy the affirmative as a strategic answer to critical arguments that would like to forget the affirmative existed or that the world is a complete cluster.

Greenstein -- Take Back the Night: How To Crush on Theory

No one wins on theory anymore because it's a lost art; learn how to bring it back from the grave.

Lambelle -- Improving Speaker Points

Sure, speaker awards are nice, but there are other reasons to values higher speaker points. Placing yourself higher in the bracket can make all the difference in important prelim debates and elimination seeding. This elective will teach you several techniques to instantly raise your speaker points.

Lee -- The Assassin (Cutting a Case Neg)

-How to Cut a Case Neg
-Strategy Check List
-Craftsmanship

Olsen -- K's for "non-K debaters"

If you refuse to understand K's, you enjoy losing. The K is a part of debate whether you like it or not. For some absurd reason, there is an "aura" of some sort around critiques. They aren't that different then other arguments. They aren't that hard to cut. Most "confusing" concepts seem confusing so K debaters can keep being lazy. We'll discuss.

Quinn -- How to be Neg against New Affs

Most 2N’s fear what some call the five scariest words of pre-round disclosure: “we’re running a new aff.” We’ll take apart the strategic position of being in the dark before the 1AC and how to use it to your advantage. You’ll have 2A’s running for the hills.

Russell -- 2NR/2AR: Closing the Door and prying it back open

The class will offer tips for winning debates in the last two rebuttals with an emphasis on strategic choice and impact assessment.

Strange -- Strategic CX

Used effectively, cross examination can help you win debates. We'll talk about the type of questions to ask and how to ask them, and we'll practice those techniques.